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UNLV Program Cuts

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AIR DATE: March 12, 2010

A Nevada regent and two deans talk about budget cuts that could see the elimination of up to seven programs at UNLV. They'll lay out how they plan to make the $9,000,000 cut mandated by the state legislature and how students will be impacted by reduced services at UNLV.

Guests:
Kevin Page, Regent, Nevada System of Higher Education
Carolyn Yucha, Dean, UNLV College of Nursing
Eric Sandgren, Dean, UNLV College of Engineering

*Correction: Nevada Congresswoman Dina Titus remains on a leave of absence without pay and without health benefits from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas while serving as Congresswoman for Nevada's Third District. We are sorry that we did not correct this last hour, in the discussion about UNLV.

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COMMENTS:
The list of the twenty most expensive programs at UNLV looks more like the do NOT cut list. These programs are in the high job demand fields. Graduates of these areas receive some of the best starting salaries. I do not think our children should have the opportunity to study for good paying jobs removed just because it is cheaper to produce graduates in low job demand fields.
Mark NewburnMar 10, 2010 08:53:03 AM
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