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Police Community Relations
Police Community Relations

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AIR DATE: August 10, 2010

Some minority communities in Las Vegas are feeling antagonized by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. Between recent officer-involved shootings, increased citations for things like jaywalking and attempted jaywalking, the recent arrest of African-American attorney David Lee Phillips all contribute to a feeling of helplessness among many minority Las Vegans.

We speak with former State Assemblyman and Founder of the local advocacy organization, The League of Action. We also speak with David Lee Phillips about his experiences. Metro has also been invited.

GUEST
Wendell Williams, former State Assemblyman and Founder, The League of Action
David Lee Phillips, attorney
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    COMMENTS:
    My heart goes out to you. I hate to hear stories like that. Hope you can do something so that kind of [expletive removed by staff] stops.
    Russell SweetAug 3, 2010 05:19:44 AM
    Cant trust them all. They are people just like anyone else who gets up and goes to work everyday looking for a paycheck. I've heard officers/Corrections Officers tell me they like going to because they can take there Frustrations out on us or inmates. What kind of Police Justice is that?
    TerranceAug 2, 2010 10:40:21 AM
    With your comment of just saying no you can't search me or my vehicle. Their response is why not if u have nothing to hide what's the problem or I've had one say, it doesn't matter cuz I'm getting in there one way or another. I had one come up to the window & ask me if I had a licence & registration. I said yes I went to go grab it out of my glove box & he quickly yelled stop what r u doing & I said getting my license & registration & he said I asked u if u had it not to get it. I though that was weird & then he asked to get get out of my car. Once I was out he asked for my license & registration & I said its in my car let me get it for u. He stopped me & said no tell me where its at & ill get it. He was just finding an excuse to search my car with out me in it. I don't trust vegas cops & some times they scare me.
    JT WhipAug 2, 2010 10:02:09 AM
    About a year ago, I along with my friend went to go meet up with another friend of ours. Our friend lived at the apartments behind a Terribles on Rancho & Bonanza. When we pulled into the apartment's parking lot. Across the street there were 2 Metro cops stopped with lights on talking with some one. Instead of getting out of the car we called my friend to tell him we were down stairs & he said he wasn't home. So we left & when we did 1 of the cops stopped me on the way out. When I asked him why he stopped me he said, cuz we were white in a black neighborhood known for drugs & that was it. Blew me away that he said that.
    JT WhipAug 2, 2010 09:44:14 AM
    I go for walks down E. Flamingo Rd. and have observed what appear to be harassment of homeless persons who are stopped at bus stops. I have not been stopped in Las Vegas. I do fear the police - from other experiences in other places I was stopped a few times for minor traffic offenses and the officers were always aggressive and assertive and there was no room for discussion. I know that they were not kum ba ya but why so harsh? It seems to be there is room for lots of human relations training and daily briefing in behaving better and being honest to the public and accepting accountability.
    Thomas PerlAug 2, 2010 09:43:29 AM
    I was stopped on Rancho Blvd. on my way to take the bar exam. I asked the police officer if I could speak with him regarding the alleged infraction. He told me that if I said another word, he would arrest me and haul me off to jail (in quite colorful language). I fully believe that Mr. Phillips was unjustly stopped and something needs to be done to place a check on Metro PD
    JeffersonAug 2, 2010 09:40:29 AM
    Question for David lee Phillips, Was there any video cameras to capture the event that took place back in Feb. 2008?
    neoAug 2, 2010 09:36:56 AM
    If I were walking around our neighborhood carrying a club after midnight I would expect to be stopped. If I was not stopped and questioned I would be disappointed in our police.
    markAug 2, 2010 09:35:56 AM
    There is a disconnect in your story: How did officer Reyes end up on the ground when he tried to separate your feet upon trying to search you for a weapon.
    markAug 2, 2010 09:31:34 AM
    I have the utmost respect for the police. They've helped me when I needed help the most, but I do agree with your guest. There are some bad and unprofessional officers. I was pulled over by a Henderson police officer (officer S. Lewis) with a hothead who yelled at me for no reason. I wouldn't want a hotheaded and angry officer behind the trigger of a gun. Who knows what could've happen when you are angry and acting irrational.
    VanAug 2, 2010 09:28:26 AM
    My family and I recently relocated to Las Vegas a little over a year ago. During this period I have been profiled twice by LVMPD. One evening, while walking home on Cheyenne after returning a few items to the local library, I was profiled with regard to area home invasions. With the cruiser spotlight on me under the dark evening sky (for all the world to see) I was publicly interrogated by two officers with questions such as "What's your first and last name?", "Where are you coming from?", "Where do you live?", and "Do you know anything about the recent home invasions?", "What about your friends?", etc. As a new resident of Las Vegas, the officers' line of questioning in both incidents reflected a segregationist and discriminatory attitude. Segregationist in that I did not have the right to be in predominately white areas of the city. Discriminatory in that as an African-American male I must be up to no good and that my "friends" are also up to no good. Post-racial era? Who are we kidding? Las Vegas as the Mississippi of the West? No doubt. (p.s. When the home invaders were caught one of them was a woman and none wore prescription glasses.)
    RDBJul 30, 2010 17:13:31 PM
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