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Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education

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AIR DATE: August 20, 2010

Research shows that a strong early childhood education can benefit student throughout their education and beyond. One 40-year study even showed that students who received strong early educations were more likely to have high school diplomas, jobs and higher earnings than their peers. But how early should kids start learning? And is an early education enough to keep student achievement high throughout middle and highs school?

We continue our summer series on education in Clark County with a look at early childhood education. How best should educators take on early teaching? And are there early warning signs to address before kids begin to fail in later grades?

GUESTS
Patte Barth, Dir, Ctr for Public Ed, NSBA
Christopher A. Kearney, Prof, Psychology and Dir, UNLV Child School Refusal and Anxiety Disorders
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    COMMENTS:
    The program was a great start to a communitywide conversation. The next conversation should include United Way of Southern Nevada CEO/Dan Goulet and Director of Education; Dolores Hauck to convey the community supported and sponsored PK education initiatives. UWSN is providing professional development training to teachers in Child Development Centers and have engaged the Smith Center for Wolf Trap Early Learning Through the Arts and High Scope Educational Research Foundation to provide PK teacher training and they are the authors of the Perry PK 40 year longitudinal study with ROI of 17:1 on PK investments. In addition, UWSN and CCSD have launched the first local longitudinal data collection and study on school readiness indicators for success. The long-term community outcome will be increased on-time graduation rates. UWSN is affecting health issues and financial stability of families absolutely important to the community. Please consider interviews of PK teachers and parents to voice what they know to meet their needs. UWSN is funding Tuition Assistance PK Scholarships to assist families with Poverty Guidelines that have lost their state childcare assistance due to unemployment.
    Dolores HauckAug 13, 2010 10:31:46 AM
    I have had a very positive experience with early childhood education. However, I was lucky. My mom is a special education teacher and my mother-in-law is a retired child development professor. My oldest daughter has PDD-NOS, a high-functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Through my mothers' encouragement, I got her into Early Childhood Education not long after she turned three. If I had not had their knowledge, I never would have gotten her the help she needed until she was 5 and going into kindergarten. No one wants to believe their children have learning problems. Research shows that for Autistic Spectrum Disorders the earlier the interventions, the better chance the child has to become a contributing adult, and that has proven perfectly true for us. My daughter is now in a magnet high school, and, except for common teenage problems blown up into Autistic proportions, you cannot tell she even has a disability. My youngest daughter was also placed in Early Childhood, with a speech impediment which turned out to be a symptom of a major learning disability. Early childhood has been a huge help to my family, but what about those who do not have my luck? I worry about those families.
    KaraleeAug 12, 2010 09:50:45 AM
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