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Cyberbullying 2.0
Cyberbullying 2.0

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AIR DATE: January 18, 2011

Six Carson City school girls were arrested for posting an "Attack A Teacher" Facebook event. The girls claimed it was a joke, but the local sheriff and school district took the post seriously. The site had threatening comments, and 18 students clicked "Yes," they would attend. Typically, students have harassed other students. Is this a new form of cyberbullying? How is it changing the classroom? And who's ultimately responsible for policing kids online? The experts weigh in. Tell us what you think.

GUESTS
Justin Patchin, Co-dir, Cyberbullying Research Center; Assoc Prof of Criminal Justice, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

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COMMENTS:
According to a recent study, nearly 7 in 10 teens believe cyberbullying is a serious problem and even more think there should be strickter rules about online bullying. 20% of students report having experienced cyberbullying and 10% have cyberbullied. Targets of digital abuse are twice as likely to have received treatment from a mental health professional. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) can help.
Georgia NeuJan 14, 2011 15:42:15 PM
I am a volunteer for the (ISC)2® Safe and Secure Online Program (https://cyberexchange.isc2.org/safe-secure.aspx). We help children 11-14 (middle school)protect themselves online. Our delivery covers keeping your computer secure, keeping yourself safe online and where to go for help. The presentation also covers cyber-bullying and includes a very powerful video. I have now talked with almost 2K kids and last night had the opportunity to meet with some of the parents at Findlay Middle School. Your piece this morning was excellent and I hope to hear more. I would certainly look forward to any opportunity in future to discuss how we can help educate the kinds AND their parents. Best regards,
F. Gary Alu, CISSP, CISM, CRISCJan 13, 2011 13:14:54 PM
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