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Campaign Finance Reform in Nevada and Arizona
Campaign Finance Reform in Nevada and Arizona

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AIR DATE: June 29, 2011

The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Arizona candidates will no longer be able to use public money to match funds their political counterparts raised to spend during an election cycle. Meanwhile, Gov. Sandoval recently signed a slew of new campaign finance reform laws pushed by Secretary of State Ross Miller. We look at the SCOTUS decision in Arizona and the new campaign rules in Nevada.
 
GUESTS
Ross Miller, Nevada Secretary of State
Ian Mychreest, KNPR Producer
Todd Lang, Exec Dir, AZ Citizens Clean Elections Commission
Nick Nyhart, Pres and CEO, Public Campaign
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    COMMENTS:
    Any politician that has an answere to an issue that is all one way is bought by advocates of that idea because no idea is that clear cut. second the real issue is gerrymandering which keeps districts clearly in one party or another when instead of a jig saw boundary line, it should just be a square or some basic shape. The affect of the jig saw is that the issues are not truly argued out locally but are pushed up stream to the jurisdictions capitol where it is easy for the lobyists to reach the representative. In my opinion the issues should be listned to and fought out in each district locally where say blacks and whites or poor and rich or for illegals and against illegals form the constituency that the politician has to listen to. Third There is no discussion here about the accountability of the corporations who continually ask for more clear definition of what the law says so they can more easily skirt it. For example claiming that union officials are taking bribes doesn't address the fact that some corporate person paid those bribes or going from dinner to finger food to get around the serving food issue at fund raisers.
    bill lenhartJun 28, 2011 10:14:39 AM
    I do not know one person who would trust a politician. The system will corrupt even honest people. Any new rules will be averted by new rule breaking. This law, while trying to force the process to be transparent, will just have the money hidden in other ways.
    JamesJun 28, 2011 09:30:41 AM
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