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Mayor Goodman Talks about Progress
Mayor Goodman Talks about Progress

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AIR DATE: November 18, 2011

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman wants to make Las Vegas more business friendly.  Are those efforts paying off?  Do companies want to relocate to Vegas?  And, are entrepreneurs encourage to start businesses in this city?

GUEST
Carolyn Goodman, Mayor, Las Vegas

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    COMMENTS:
    Doing business and how to make it better varies for every industry. Mine is Massage therapy,and the City makes it extremely difficult to obtain a license for a personal office. Not only is the cost much higher than others for a "privilege" the restrictions are ridiculous. For example,I am opening a fitness studio with a single room designated for massage. The room is restricted in size that is really too small to effectively perform my job, there are further restrictions on advertising. I cannot place a "massage" sign in my window or on the storefront, but people can drive huge mobile billboards with naked women and the words "Hot Babes to You" up and down the strip. It makes no sense. Licensing costs are way too high.
    Gayla CoughlinNov 15, 2011 09:35:07 AM
    The poor quality of education in Nevada is killing our economic potential. I'm a recent graduate of UNLV. I worked hard & did very well among my peers. I can't find work. In fact, of the entire graduating class of people from my department, I know of ONE who has found full-time employment related to our field of study. I did finally land a paid internship, where my boss complained that he tried to fill the position for months, but that none of the local colleges/universities were turning out employable graduates. It's unbelievable to me that we've continued to make cuts to an educational system that is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, already woefully inadequate.
    BenNov 15, 2011 09:28:51 AM
    College level education is up to the student. Showing an employer you know your stuff is up to you. Education troubles begin at the elementary level here. My kids attend public school, and I see way too much emphasis on mute points and redundancy in a poorly designed curriculum.
    Gayla CoughlinNov 15, 2011 09:43:55 AM
    Look, I'm not excusing anyone from their personal responsibility to work hard & excel in either a professional or educational setting. At least in my field, the skills taught at UNLV do not meet the demands of the private sector. What we're looking at is a systematic failure of what is supposed to be a key driver of economic & social prosperity in our community. It is unfair & unrealistic to blame students for not knowing what employers expect of them. Tuiition is paid in good faith to our institutions of higher learning with the understanding that faculty & curricula are relevant. It doesn't matter how hard you work in school, when the subject matter is outdated & useless.
    BenNov 15, 2011 10:54:59 AM
    Agreed about outdated information. I.T.moves too quickly, related fields along with it. However, it is not the University's job to discover what employers want,that is too monumentous a task! They offer courses for sale, it is a business first. Buyer beware applies to colleges,too. Unfortunately.
    GaylaNov 15, 2011 14:21:22 PM
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