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Recession Means Feral Cat Population Continues to Grow
Recession Means Feral Cat Population Continues to Grow

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AIR DATE: May 9, 2012

There are anywhere from 250 to 300 thousand stray and feral cats in the Las Vegas valley.  It's hard to get an exact count but animal protection advocates say they have methods of counting.  And they also say the number of feral cats and cat colonies has increased significantly with the recession; people just abandoning their homes and their cats.  We talk to a panel of animal advocates about efforts to control those populations.  They also help you understand how to deal with stray cats in your neighborhood.
 
GUESTS
Keith Williams, Community Cat Coalition of Clark County, C-5
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    COMMENTS:
    I feed a colony of feral cats. I lost one due to a speeding car on my street. It felt like losing one of my own kids. They show their affection in many ways appropriate to a cat. They were in the TNR program because the neighbors moved away and left them in my yard.
    Norma PriceMay 10, 2012 08:41:08 AM
    My neighbor lost their house and asked me to feed their cat. Two other cats discovered this, and started feeding. One day, the neighbors cat went missing. A few days later, I decided to let one of the other street cats in my house. We had her spayed, and gave her shots. The mean street cat turned out to be the most loving cat I've ever had. I never had to train her for litter, or had to worry about her escaping. She's a great friend!
    JasonMay 9, 2012 21:39:27 PM
    The TNR groups have vastly helped with the feral cat population. They have also helped with making apartment complexes more pet friendly, and reducing pet security fees, which has helped stabilize drop offs to shelters. I helped with trapping a colony in a neighborhood of foreclosures. I have adopted abandoned cats. The TNR people are dedicated people who give the cats a chance. Thank you.
    samantha michaelsonMay 9, 2012 17:37:45 PM
    THANKS !!! Thanks to ALL these people who help with the CATS. My Wife & I manage a property in LAs Vegas and inherited a cat-colony. We have gotten a huge amount of INFORMATION and help to keep these cats spade. THANKS THANKS THANKS
    RichardMay 9, 2012 10:39:16 AM
    Banning feeding feral cats never works. Hard to criminalize compassion. I have one 18 year old feral cat, when I did TNR 17 years ago, there were a dozen. They all lived good lives and I shouldn't be a criminal for feeding them.
    HollyMay 9, 2012 10:34:18 AM
    AS far as I know Cats do NOT EAT RATS . they will kill rats because they like to kill rats but will not eat them .. also if you see a cat with a tipped ear they are probably nutered ... farrel cats will breed at about the age of 4 months . I like the farrel cats because they help with the mouse population . We tolerate them even though I do have a bird bath , and have no problem with mice the people in my neighborhood who chase away the cats have a mouse problem
    Maria HuffMay 9, 2012 10:34:08 AM
    Interesting that KNPR has aired TWO programs this morning regarding "feral" animals--wild horses and cats....doesn't each population have a value and a niche? As regards feral cats, it is NIMBY in action here in Nevada. They aren't going away, ever, so TSN is the only answer. Just too bad that more veterinarians aren't on board with it. And, why doesn't Nevada let retired, licesensed vets from elsewhere do TSN? My partner is licensed in Texas and New Mexico, but we just had to go to Jamaica to do TSN!!!!
    Colleen GavinMay 9, 2012 10:26:25 AM
    Can you explain what NIMBY does in Nevada? I live in California, and have suppported feral cat colonies myself, in my own backyard. I have never heard of any "requirements" in order to do TNR or as you say, TSN for ferals. People do this voluntarily, on their own time. So I don't understand how a state can disallow this humane and sensible solution to the problem.
    Jacqueline TexierMay 9, 2012 11:44:51 AM
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