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Did Desegregation Fail
Did Desegregation Fail

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AIR DATE: May 18, 2012

In 1954, the Supreme Court made history with Brown v. Board of Education, putting black and white children in the same public school classrooms.  But one UNLV scholar says desegregation wasn’t the great victory everyone thought it was.  Sonya Horsford interviewed eight superintendents who went to segregated schools, and now oversee desegregated districts.  We talk to her about her book, Learning in a Burning House: Educational Inequality, Ideology, and (Dis)Integration.
 
GUEST
Sonya Horsford, Sr Resident Scholar of Ed, The Lincy Inst, UNLV
 
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    COMMENTS:
    I believe integration did succeed, but like when black folks moved into white communities, those affluent enough moved away. What it left behind are schools that are poorly funded and that are leaving both poor white and poor/middle class black behind. The system became not a race issue but a class issue and as long as we hide behind the MYTH of the American Dream, where money determines your success those families that came with bagage (poor literacy, no family member in higher education, stuck in jobs not paying a decent wage) you will not be able to obtain that dream all parents have for a meaningful education (no matter your ethnic background).
    PatMay 17, 2012 10:59:24 AM
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