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Can Las Vegas Become A Walkable City?
Can Las Vegas Become A Walkable City?

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AIR DATE: February 27, 2013

Jeff Speck, city planner and bestselling author, believes that the best way to battle problems like climate change, high national obesity rates, and oil dependence is by creating more walkable cities. In 'Walkable City,' Speck says more people are losing their love of cars and moving to urban settings in order to walk.

 
 
GUESTS
 
Jeff Speck, author "Suburban Nation" and "Walkable City"

 

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    COMMENTS:
    One thing that unfortunately works against walkability is the erection of fences and other barriers to (I assume) keep vagrants away from certain areas/neighborhoods. I like to walk and many efficient, straightline paths are thusly blocked. And of course there are those cul de sac layouts and those "only one way in or out" neighborhoods.
    Aunty PalinFeb 25, 2013 09:09:03 AM
    If you look at the UNLV Midtown project, thats a good example of trying to create a space where people who want to exercise their liberty of living together in a community close to work and school can do so. And its not some socialist plot. Sheesh. For more info: http://midtown.unlv.edu/about.html
    Jim in HendersonFeb 25, 2013 08:17:27 AM
    Yeah, Midtown UNLV is a boon for all... eminent domain, huge payoffs for connected individuals, lots of tax money going to private and pseudo-private interests, traffic congestion beyond belief, displacing poor people and businesses, providing UNLV image instead of substance, etc.! The reality is that it's just the vision of one narcissistic central planner being foisted upon everyone else. How about letting the private sector do what it does best without interference or cronyism: providing people what they want and need at prices that they can afford? Indeed, that's what happening *now* in the proposed Midtown UNLV sector, and at no cost to the taxpayer.
    Tom HurstFeb 25, 2013 12:41:07 PM
    The American way life, in the west in particular, is built around our freedom to travel when, where and how we want; and that is mostly via private vehicle. To try and force people into some Euro-socialist style communal living is immoral, unnatural, and foolish. Which is why *all* centrally planned societies throughout history have failed. I, for one, prefer Liberty instead of a politically-correct "walkable" city!
    Tom HurstFeb 22, 2013 16:05:28 PM
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